Review: Dreaming At the Top of My Lungs

Writing effective, evocative short stories is a challenge for any writer, no matter the genre—but one can argue that it is exceedingly difficult for the writer of horror. There is a certain amount of requisite detail, a balanced level of development in regard to mood and setting that is key to successfully drawing a reader… Continue reading Review: Dreaming At the Top of My Lungs

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Review: Child of Winter by T.R. Hitchman

Reminiscent of Shirley Jackson’s work. Hitchman is fluent in the language of mood and emotion, a deep wellspring of feeling bubbling up through her rich, lustrous prose. One feels at home in the writing, which displays a great depth of understanding in regard to psychology and interpersonal relationships. Indeed, so much of Hitchman’s power lies… Continue reading Review: Child of Winter by T.R. Hitchman

Review: Peel Back the Skin

A deep, dark dive into the bitter moat of the soul. Peel Back the Skin offers fifteen tales of physical and spiritual degradation that shed terrible light on the darkest reaches of the reader’s psyche. Here the line between justice and revenge is blurred, the guilty and the innocent alike executing their black designs. Unreliable… Continue reading Review: Peel Back the Skin

Review: Garden of Fiends

This is a truly dark concept for an anthology, and for someone who’s struggled with his own addictions over the years it was a nightmarish walk down memory lane. I will admit I was unfamiliar with most of the artists in the collection, save for Jack Ketchum and John F.D. Taff—I knew Mr. Taff from… Continue reading Review: Garden of Fiends

Review: I Can Taste the Blood

I can taste the talent! Five deliciously twisted and varied voices united by one truly chilling refrain make up this thrilling and highly original collection of modern horror. Artists will know that the moment of inspiration can come at anytime, anywhere—as simple as hearing a snippet of hushed conversation, catching a fleeting glimpse of something… Continue reading Review: I Can Taste the Blood

Review: Deadsville by T.D. Trask and Dale Elster

It is always a delicate dance when two writers take on the task of co-authoring a book. There is never any guarantee that the final product will ring true, that the artists will complement each other. Thankfully, in this case, T.D. Trask and Dale Elster have developed a common language and style in crafting a… Continue reading Review: Deadsville by T.D. Trask and Dale Elster

Review: Virginia by William Esmont

A short but terrifying ride. In Virginia, William Esmont confronts us with a dreadful question: exactly how far would you be willing to go in order to save a loved one? For Ray Shelby, the answer is pretty far. Much in the vein of Stephen King’s short story “Quitters, Inc.” and David Fincher’s film The… Continue reading Review: Virginia by William Esmont

Review: Blood Related by William Cook

William Cook is a painter of impressions and moods, artfully rendering complex, authentic characters and weaving a twisted, darkly psychological narrative. In his exploration of the minds of a pair of prolific serial killers (those peculiar creatures of popular morbid interest), Cook introduces us to the Cunningham  brothers – products of a long hereditary line… Continue reading Review: Blood Related by William Cook

Review: Snare by Carrie Nelkin

In Snare – The Waiting Dark (Published 2015 by Permuted Press), author Carrie Nelkin delivers a truly unsettling tale of paranormal horror and intrigue that does not disappoint. Nelkin doesn’t cut any corners with cheap scares, building the terror slowly and subtly with a finely measured approach. Page by page, she gradually introduces us to… Continue reading Review: Snare by Carrie Nelkin

Review: Monstrumfuhrer by Edward Erdelac

Edward M. Erdelac’s new novel Monstrumfuhrer is a tour de force, playing on the classic horror convention of science gone awry. The novel posits Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein as truth, the main character (Jotham Podczaski) and his brother (Eli) discovering the correspondence of Captain Robert Walton in the attic of a Polish bookstore in which they are… Continue reading Review: Monstrumfuhrer by Edward Erdelac